99%digital

10 cosas que aprendí la semana pasada:

1- Toda reunión se puede cancelar
2- No hay que dejar el ejercicio
3 -De vez en cuando es bueno comer grasita
4- El que busca encuentra
5- Lo escrito es diferente a lo dicho
6- Siempre hay algún problema
7- Siempre se puede solucionar
8- La gripa siempre gana
9- Todos tienen un jefe
10 -Sin datos o internet somos nada

nerdology:

This year Wired is sending their reporters to cover CES only using phones.
What a crazy, insane, minigame inside the biggest news week for tech.

Instead of the usual mix of old hands and greenhorns, WIRED’s crew is comprised entirely of CES veterans. Which means that covering it would be, like, easy for our team. Easy, that is, if we didn’t intentionally make things harder. So we’re not letting them use computers.
This year at CES, our core crew of reporters can use only their phones to cover the show—this includes any text, images, video or audio content they create. No DSLRS, no laptops; no fancy compact-system cameras or iPads. Just phones. (Our photo department reserves the right to swap out terrible images; you’re welcome.) We’ll call it our CES Mobile ChallengeSmartphone Superchallenge Smartphone Thunderdome. And to make it more interesting, no two reporters will use the same brand of handset–or even the same platform. We’re giving each of them a different rig and pitting them against each other in a winner-takes-all blogging smackdown.

I was working for the video team at The Verge and covered CES 2012. It was crazy, insane, and I have no idea how anyone can do it without a laptop. If only to see what happens, I’m definitely going to keep an eye on Wired this week.
I look forward to the editorials following. Especially, “My CES with a Blackberry Z30”. Oh, and I’m definitely rooting for the Lumia 1020.
[via Wired]

#Wired reporters cover #CES2014 event only with their phones

nerdology:

This year Wired is sending their reporters to cover CES only using phones.

What a crazy, insane, minigame inside the biggest news week for tech.

Instead of the usual mix of old hands and greenhorns, WIRED’s crew is comprised entirely of CES veterans. Which means that covering it would be, like, easy for our team. Easy, that is, if we didn’t intentionally make things harder. So we’re not letting them use computers.

This year at CES, our core crew of reporters can use only their phones to cover the show—this includes any text, images, video or audio content they create. No DSLRS, no laptops; no fancy compact-system cameras or iPads. Just phones. (Our photo department reserves the right to swap out terrible images; you’re welcome.) We’ll call it our CES Mobile ChallengeSmartphone Superchallenge Smartphone Thunderdome. And to make it more interesting, no two reporters will use the same brand of handset–or even the same platform. We’re giving each of them a different rig and pitting them against each other in a winner-takes-all blogging smackdown.

I was working for the video team at The Verge and covered CES 2012. It was crazy, insane, and I have no idea how anyone can do it without a laptop. If only to see what happens, I’m definitely going to keep an eye on Wired this week.

I look forward to the editorials following. Especially, “My CES with a Blackberry Z30”. Oh, and I’m definitely rooting for the Lumia 1020.

[via Wired]

#Wired reporters cover #CES2014 event only with their phones

#NASA has created the Robonaut  #Robot #Tech

txchnologist
:

Space Station Robot Getting Its Legs

Creepy or cool? NASA has been working on creating legs for the Robonaut 2, a helper robot currently in service aboard the International Space Station. The agency says the extra appendages are needed to give Robonaut more mobility. With the robot able to move around more easily, the ISS crew will be freed from mundane tasks inside and outside the station. 

Robonaut is currently attached to a support post. With legs, the robot will be able to move around more easily and use both hands while grasping with at least one foot.

Read More

Portraits 

martinekenblog
:

Monochrome portraits by Tigran Tsitoghdzyan

The monochrome portraits of the Armenian artist Tigran Tsitoghdzyan, who through his series “Millennium” and “Mirror” blend surrealism and hyperrealism into beautiful oil paintings.

(Source: ufunk.net)

gjmueller:


How Social Networks Are Making Us Smarter

Many believe the secret to why some cultures thrive and others disappear may lie in our social networks and our ability to imitate — more important qualities than individual intelligence, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia. 
As published by the Proceedings of the Royal Academy: Biological Sciences, investigators show that when people can observe and learn from a wider range of teachers, groups can better maintain technical skills and even increase the group’s average skill over successive generations.
“This is the first study to demonstrate in a laboratory setting what archeologists and evolutionary theorists have long suggested: that there is an important link between a society’s sociality and the sophistication of its technology,” says Muthukrishna, who co-authored the research with UBC Prof. Joseph Henrich.

image via flickr:CC | hanspoldoja


#Socialmedia make us smarter

gjmueller:

How Social Networks Are Making Us Smarter

Many believe the secret to why some cultures thrive and others disappear may lie in our social networks and our ability to imitate — more important qualities than individual intelligence, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia.

As published by the Proceedings of the Royal Academy: Biological Sciences, investigators show that when people can observe and learn from a wider range of teachers, groups can better maintain technical skills and even increase the group’s average skill over successive generations.

“This is the first study to demonstrate in a laboratory setting what archeologists and evolutionary theorists have long suggested: that there is an important link between a society’s sociality and the sophistication of its technology,” says Muthukrishna, who co-authored the research with UBC Prof. Joseph Henrich.

image via flickr:CC | hanspoldoja

#Socialmedia make us smarter

(via techspotlight)

mrdingo:

Cool! Brazilian illustrator Frederico Birchal has put together a sharp series of posters featuring famous costumes from music.

Artist ilustrations

(Source: butteron)

joshbyard:

Study: Nearly Half of US Jobs Could be Done by Computers

A recent study out of Oxford University found that almost half of U.S. jobs are vulnerable to being taken over by computers as artificial intelligence continues to improve.
The study, based on 702 detailed job listings, found that computers could already replace many workers in transportation and logistics, production labor and administrative support. But computers, armed with the ability to find patterns in big data sets, are also increasingly qualified to perform “non-routine cognitive tasks.”

“While computerization has been historically confined to routine tasks involving explicit rule-based activities, algorithms for big data are now rapidly entering domains reliant upon pattern recognition and can readily substitute for labor in a wide range of non-routine cognitive tasks,” write study authors Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne.


(via Nearly Half of U.S. Jobs Could Be Done by Computers, Study Says | Singularity Hub)


Prepare for be replaced for a #robot #tech

joshbyard:

Study: Nearly Half of US Jobs Could be Done by Computers

A recent study out of Oxford University found that almost half of U.S. jobs are vulnerable to being taken over by computers as artificial intelligence continues to improve.

The study, based on 702 detailed job listings, found that computers could already replace many workers in transportation and logistics, production labor and administrative support. But computers, armed with the ability to find patterns in big data sets, are also increasingly qualified to perform “non-routine cognitive tasks.”

“While computerization has been historically confined to routine tasks involving explicit rule-based activities, algorithms for big data are now rapidly entering domains reliant upon pattern recognition and can readily substitute for labor in a wide range of non-routine cognitive tasks,” write study authors Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne.

(via Nearly Half of U.S. Jobs Could Be Done by Computers, Study Says | Singularity Hub)

Prepare for be replaced for a #robot #tech

(via futurescope)

thetechgets:

Microsoft Surface 2 Ad shows more functionality [Video]

Microsoft’s marketing campaign for its original Surface was undoubtedly one of the worst for a major product launch in recent memory: Instead of showing people what the Surface was capable of doing, Microsoft literally had people break dancing while twirling the Surface up in the air. The good news is that the company seems to have learned its lessons and has produced a solid ad for its Surface 2 in which it explains why the Surface can do a lot more than an iPad. What makes the ad interesting is Microsoft’s framing — it first describes the Surface 2 as “not just a laptop” before also says that it’s “not just a tablet,” which indicates that the company is trying more to pitch the device as a super-portable laptop replacement more than a direct iPad rival.

Source: The Tech Gets

#Surface, one device for everything #microsoft

(Source: thetechgets)

teradome:

I’ve always hoped that desktop computers would get to this level of LEGO-like plug & play, but since the phone is the desktop computing of the future, moving the idea to phones makes sense.

I just don’t want blocks falling off while I’m trying to take it out of my pocket, is all.

#PhoneBlockes un teléfono customizable y a la vez una startup #tech #Innovation

(Source: youtube.com, via teradome)